The Big Epic

Connecting with Nature - One Adventure at a Time

Tag: Nuts n Bolts (page 1 of 2)

Outside–Inside: Getting Started with Forest Therapy

On the inside, each of us may be weary, overwhelmed, or stressed out. On the outside, Nature goes on like it always does: changing, moving, cycling through the seasons but feeling like a constant, reliable presence in the world. We need to move the outside perspective inside. Throughout history, humans have found relaxation and calm when they connect with Nature. This is the premise behind Forest Therapy: nature itself provides therapeutic healing and wholeness for humans.

In the practice of Forest Therapy Guiding, clients learn how to make personal connections with the natural world. By doing this, they access the health benefits of woods and flowing water, including gaining more energy, feeling relaxed, and regaining a calm balance for daily living. The guide (that will be me!) facilitates this process by offering “invitations” for clients to interact and connect with Nature.

“At the heart of every invitation is a simple encouragement to play.” –Amos Clifford

Forest Therapy focuses on experiencing nature and noticing what is found in the non-human world. Guides take individuals or small groups of clients outdoors for sessions that often last 1-2 hours but cover less than one mile of walking trails. This is ideal…but sometimes we need mini-refreshers in our everyday lives. The rest of this blog post offers simple connection steps that can be used any place where one can interact with nature—even in our yards or in busy city parks.

guided forest walk

ENTRANCE:

Going through a doorway into a new place, gets us ready to experience what we find there.  In a similar way, it helps us to more quickly connect with the non-human world if we take time to acknowledge a similar threshold.

1—Start with “Presence.” As you step outside, close your eyes and take five slow, deep breaths. Then stand quietly for a few moments. What do you feel around you? What nature sounds can you hear? What do you smell? Open your eyes, and look carefully at the natural world. As we interact and connect with the non-human world, we focus on being present rather than on doing.

2—Set Aside Distractions. Silence your cell phone. Find a small rock. Hold it in your hand. Imagine giving the rock your worries, stresses, and hectic to-do lists to be held until you come back. Set the rock back down. You can choose to pick up these things again at the end of your nature time, if you still want them.

3—Move Slowly. Notice what natural things are in motion around you. If your thoughts wander or if you find yourself walking fast, STOP! Take a few slow, deep breaths. While standing still, focus again on what natural things are in motion. Resume moving slowly.

forest therapy

INVITATIONS:

All invitations in Forest Therapy are based on one of these two focuses: physical senses or emotional senses. In an in-person session, specific applications of these invitations are offered, carefully tailored for the individual clients and the actual location where the guided walk occurs. These examples give you general ways to interact and connect with Nature.

1—Focus on the Outside World. As you walk, notice the sensory experiences: temperature, texture, motion, sound, smells, taste, sights. Pay attention to details such as individual trees, tiny plants, critters, moving water. Stop regularly to notice how you would complete this sentence: “Outside I see…..”

2—Acknowledge the Inside World. As you interact with different aspects of Nature, notice the sensual experiences. What emotional responses are you experiencing? Possibly joy, delight or playfulness. Sometimes sadness or anger. There are no “right” or “wrong” responses to the non-human world. Just like we do for the outside world, stop regularly to focus on how you would complete this sentence: “Inside I feel…” Forest Therapy

COMPLETION:

At the end of your time in nature, whether you spent 10 minutes or 2 hours, it is helpful to acknowledge crossing a threshold back to daily life. Repeat the first rituals: close your eyes and take slow, deep breaths. Remind yourself of the outside and the inside ways you experienced Nature. Choose one thought or feeling to take with you. If you feel a need to carry your distractions and worries again, retrieve them from the rock where you left them. (Perhaps you will feel enough calm to let the rock hold those stresses for a while longer…)

If you are interested in learning more about Forest Therapy, read more on my website HERE. Consider signing up for email notification each time I publish a new blog post—which will be about the many different ways my daughter and I connect with nature. (Right side bar on computer, scroll to bottom of page on mobile phone.) If you would like specific mini-invitations to try during lunch break or for a short walk in a park, consider making a donation to my go-fund-me campaign to help me become a certified Forest Therapy Guide. At the $17 donation level or above, you will receive a daily email for one week which gives you “invitations” to interact with trees, the sky, moving water, and more. You can learn more HERE.

May you take some of the peaceful presence of Nature back with you into your daily life!

Let’s Run Away with the Tiny-Mes!

(If you are new and haven’t yet met our Tiny-Mes, read their introduction HERE.)

The Tiny-Mes apparently don’t like dreary, gray Ohio winters. (Hmmm…just like us!) They disappeared not long after we finished our fall backpacking trip. Winter doesn’t want to let go around here, but the Tiny-Mes showed up recently, just in time to help plan our next adventures. (I asked where they had been. All they said was “someplace sunny!” They won’t say if it was snowy sun or sunning on a beach. Either way, we are glad to see them again!)

At the first hint of spring, we start dreaming and planning. So many possibilities! So many directions we could go! So many people we could reconnect with! All of us love to study maps…

This year it looks like we will make an Epic Road Trip to son’s graduation in Montana. The Tiny-Mes had to get passports—we are headed into Canada to explore the mountains! Plus there will be a summer Appalachian Trail (AT) adventure in Vermont with a friend or two. And possibly, another fall trip to TN to fill in a section of the AT that we missed last year.

Now that we have a general plan, it is time to get out the guide books, the maps, and the computer. I’m sure I’ve told you before (HERE and HERE) how much I love making detailed plans and itineraries! As always, I have to cut out about half of what we dream of doing.  Hubby encourages our wanderings…but wants us back home sometimes! HA!

Next, it’s time to pull out all our gear from the storage closet. We check to see that everything is clean and in good repair. We figure out what needs replaced or what we hope to upgrade. The Tiny-Mes decided try out a hammock this year. They say it will be the perfect piece of gear for a road trip.

We can’t wait to get back to the Great Outdoors! We love wandering and exploring new places. And we look forward to sharing more stories with you. May can’t come soon enough…

The Tiny-Mes urge you to consider sponsoring my upcoming training to become a Forest Therapy Guide. YOU could win the drawing on May 7th to have your own personalized Tiny-Me join us on our summer backpacking trip! Wouldn’t it be fun to vicariously adventure with us? Find out how to support me HERE. Get the details about the drawing HERE (scroll down to $57 level).


I Need YOUR Help!

As many of you know, I was accepted into the training program to become a certified Forest Therapy Guide. This training begins in September with a week-long intensive experience in NW Ohio, followed by six months of weekly mentoring calls and practical experience. By next spring I will complete my certification and will begin offering Forest Therapy sessions as a coaching business. (You can read more about this in the Nature Therapy tab on this website…)

I Need YOUR Help to get to this training. Will you CHEER ME ON? Will you DONATE? Will you SHARE my story with others?

Normally, our family figures out ways to personally pay for whatever projects we decide to take on. In this case, I have a one-time opportunity to complete training in my own state, rather than paying significantly higher transportation costs for a program in Northern California (or overseas!) at a later date. Unfortunately, this means we can’t just save money for a year or two to be able to cover the costs with cash up front. In addition, one son is finishing his final year of college plus hubby was unemployed last year. The time feels right to jump into this business opportunity that fits my passions…but the personal finances just aren’t available.

Thank You for your support!

The direct link to my Go-Fund-Me campaign is https://www.gofundme.com/ForestTherapyJill  From that page you can read a summary of my story (and find links back to this website and blog). You can make donations there and see the list of unique perks I am offering for donors. To share with friends, you can email them this direct link or you can click the fb button on my campaign page to share via Facebook.

Don’t miss the really awesome perks for DONORS. Check out the list HERE (or directly on the fundraising campaign page above). I know many of us are very tight financially right now. THAT’S OKAY! I also need folks to SHARE my campaign with their own friends who might be interested in helping me. And this “putting myself out there” to ask for support is an uncomfortable stretch for me. I need folks to CHEER ME ON (in comments, Facebook responses, and emails) as I start this new adventure! Please consider how you might best support me.

Thanks in advance for whatever help you can give me!

New Year–New Adventures

Raise your hand if you have (yet again) set New Year’s Resolutions. Raise your hand if you have (yet again) already broken those resolutions two weeks into the new year. Tired of repeated “failure,” I decided to try something different this year. Rather than setting big goals, I chose to find what is working and build on that. I took time to look back through my planner and summarize the activities of past year. Next, I decided which things I wanted to continue in the coming year, and which activities I wanted to change or add.

Far too many days, I find myself wishing for something new, something different,  something more exciting. (Please tell me you do the same?!) The most interesting thing to me about this reflection process was realizing how content I am with my current life, overall. There actually isn’t much I really want to change!

LOOKING BACK:

  • Regular activities included church, getting together with friends, and taking Daughter to the city for church organ lessons (and visiting) with my Mom.
  • Significant time was spent getting Daughter to 4H meetings, homeschool co-op, Equine Therapy, and finding her an emotional support dog.
  • We continue to put down roots in our friendly small-town. In addition, hubby found a local job (after 4 months of unemployment) and we eliminated the hassles of commuting and of home ownership in multiple locations.
  • Family time included wonderful visits from grown kids, spoiling grandbabies, having our future daughter-in-law live with us for the spring, and celebrating their marriage when son got home from a semester spent in Ireland. On the other hand, there were far too many deaths this year (my dad, an uncle, and parents of friends and extended family).
  • Daughter and I had wonderful adventures last year: a few days at the Outer Banks for Spring Break (thanks, Sis!), taking my mom on a mini-adventure to celebrate her 80th birthday, dayhikes and local camping with friends. Of course, we spent time on another month-long AT adventure!

NO REASON TO CHANGE:

  • We enjoy regular contact with others and will continue most of the activities in the first three areas listed above.
  • Family will see changes this year as grown kids visit, graduate, change jobs and move around the country. But spending time together never gets old!
  • We are committed to enjoying Nature and going on adventures large and small. We will continue local exploration, hiking, and camping.

NEW ADVENTURES: We have a few big things planned. These are things you can expect to read about here on the blog in the coming year.

So many new possibilities to explore!

 

  • We anticipate an extended road trip to attend son’s university graduation in Montana in May. There are a number of National Parks we haven’t yet visited. We are updating passports so we can head into Canada for additional sightseeing. Heads up friends and family along the way—we hope to stop by for coffee, late night chats and sleeping on your couch!
  • Our AT Adventure this year will likely be a summer trip through the 100 Mile Wilderness in Maine. Looks like we may also get to introduce another friend to the joys of backpacking!
  • I found my “Dream Job” and can’t wait to tell you more about it! I’m working out the organizational details right now. I’ll share details soon…

What about YOU? What are your plans for the coming year? What things are going well enough to continue largely unchanged? What new adventures do you hope to have? I’d love to hear YOUR story in the comments!

The Zen of Cold Water

Why, yes, we DO have running water while hiking in the woods. It pours out of natural springs (sometimes with a pipe installed) and ripples down streams. Oh, that’s not what you meant? You’re right, we only find faucets in “civilization.” Piped spring

Stream

So how do we get clean water that’s safe to drink? We carry a filter with us that turns any water we find into yummy, drinkable water. The biggest challenge is walking to the spring at the end of a tiring day of hiking. Here is the process:

  • Carry empty water containers to water source (ideally a level walk near shelter…but sometimes a steep, long walk away) Water pipe in spring
  • Fill collection bags with “dirty” water "Dirty" water bags
  • Screw on filter and squeeze clean water into containers for use Filtering water
  • Carry water back to camp (reservoirs for drinking while hiking, bottles to pour into pot for cooking, extra in collection bags to filter for later use) Remember, water is HEAVY so only carry what is really needed! Water containers

Because we use a small, lightweight “squeeze” filter, it takes awhile to fill all of our water containers. At first this frustrated me. But eventually I decided to consider this time as “zen time” to relax and simply enjoy the moments. Usually the water locations are scenic, with colorful leaves, rustling trees, and gurgling water. Water zen

Next time you turn on your faucet at home, take a moment to be grateful for instant, clean, safe water…uncommon in much of the world! 

Now I Lay Me Down to Sleep…

There are “shelters” along the Appalachian Trail, set aside for any hiker to stay for free. These are usually three-sided structures, open on the fourth side. A simple shelter

Older shelters (from the 1930s onward) are quite simple with no light other than what comes in under the overhang on the front opening. (Notice that even in daylight one needs a headlamp to read.) Shelter lounging

Newer shelters are often more elaborate, with decks, picnic pavilions, lofts, skylights, and more.  Like the trail itself, all are maintained by volunteers. Shelter deck

Shelters range in size, offering space for 4-10 hikers to sleep. Air mattresses and sleeping bags are spread on the platform (always at least one step above the ground, sometimes at seat height, sometimes with bunk platforms). Backpacks, coats and wet gear hang from pegs. Walking sticks and boots are usually jumbled in the corners. Sleeping bags in shelter

Shelters have nearby tent sites, some type of privy, a picnic table and a fire ring. Newer shelters have a picnic pavilion which can double as extra sleeping space on stormy nights when the shelter itself is full! Picnic pavilion

Shelters are spaced 5-13 miles apart. Whenever possible, we enjoy staying at a shelter because of the extra conveniences and because of the social interactions with other hikers. Since we hike short daily distances, however, we sometimes have to find a flat area to pitch our tent for a night between shelters. That has its own charms, including a sense of accomplishment that we can, indeed, be self-reliant. Tent

No matter where we end up for the night, we always sleep well. A day of hard exercise certainly helps!

Bear Pole?

When backpacking in bear country, it is important to hang all smelly things in a “bear bag” each night. This includes all food, trash, and personal care items. (Don’t worry, apparently even bears want nothing to do with sweaty, smelly, hiking socks and boots!)

In the past, hikers had to try to find the perfect tree…at least 200 feet from the tent with a branch 12 feet above the ground that is strong enough to hold all the items hanging at least 8 feet away from the tree trunk. Yeah, right. Not so easy to find in real life! (See more detailed instructions HERE, if interested.)

Because of the lack of perfect bear trees, most shelters and official campsites along the Appalachian Trail have installed “Bear Poles.” These metal trees have multiple hooks 12+ feet above the ground. The goal is to use the attached metal pole to lift the bear bag into the air and slide it onto one of the hooks. HAH! Bear Pole

I am hardly coordinated enough to do this at chest height where I can clearly see what I’m doing and where the weight of the bag is manageable. Trying to manage this feat with a heavy pole unbalanced by the weight of food bags becomes a comedy of missteps and errors. Hooking bear bag

I’ve decided these contraptions are actually “human torture devices.” Better yet,  they are probably secret “candid camera” set-ups for the entertainment of bears. Hanging bear bag

Yep, I can hear that young black bear snickering right now, and I’m sure granddaddy bear is guffawing at my pathetic attempts to master the seemingly simple “bear pole.” Wish me luck, folks, I think Yogi is about to have a picnic with my food!

(Note one: these photos are not representative.  They were taken at the shortest bear pole we have seen so far. Many posts are more than 12 feet high!)

(Note two: it is stacking the deck against me to have to reverse this process in the morning BEFORE I can get my hands on breakfast and morning caffeine…)

Resupply — Expedition Shopping

Grab a cart to buy mountains of food. Rebag it and throw away the wasteful packaging.

Logistics can be challenging when long-distance backpacking. The ultimate goal is to carry the lightest possible pack. In the case of gear, lighter weight means higher costs. With food and fuel, it is a balancing act of carrying enough supplies to stay on the trail for the most days possible without risking injury or exhaustion from carrying too much weight. Resupply expeditions are costly in both time and money. Most towns are at least a few miles away from the trail. This extra mileage plus all the things that get done on a Town Day usually means a day of no hiking. (If you missed it, read about the delights of a Town Day from 9/18.) Staying overnight in town obviously increases costs when compared to tent-camping in the woods for free.

“You carry your house (tent), your bed (sleeping bag), your stove, your food, and everything else you need until the next opportunity to resupply. If you need it, you have to carry it.”–AWOL (Thru-hiker David Miller)

At our slow pace and low mileage, we each eat 1 ½ pounds of food per day. (Thru-hikers pushing for 3-4 times our mileage often consume 2-3 pounds of food per day and still don’t get enough calories!) We generally plan a partial resupply at a gas station or convenience store 4-5 days after a Town Day. Other items such as fuel and dinners are only found at bigger stores in larger towns—which we reach every 7-9 days. We hustle through the grocery store with our list—oohing and ahhing over all the yummy looking food. We can buy some treats to eat while still in town. But we have to stick closely to our list for trail food—otherwise our packs would quickly be too heavy to carry! Lots of groceries

After we lug all the bags back to where we are staying overnight, we dump it all out to organize the food. Every time, we wonder how that mountain will ever fit in our packs! Daughter carries the lunch and dinner food. I carry the breakfast items and multitude of snacks. (To see a list of the types and amounts of food we carry, check out the post on Trail Journals from 9/5/15, found HERE.) Mountains of Food

We take most foods out of the wasteful, over-large, heavy packaging. Snacks are divided into individual portions to make sure we don’t mindlessly eat three or four days’ worth at one time. Don’t worry, most of these bags will be saved and reused. Other foods are mixed together in freezer weight bags, ready to have water added at meal time. Individual Portions

We have a mound of trash by the time we are finished. But now the food will fit in our packs. Wasteful Packaging

Hopefully we didn’t forget anything—it will be a long week before we get to another store!

Research and Reality

Have you checked out the FAQ tab here on the blog? At the end of the list I explain the steps involved in considering a new Big Epic: “Brainstorming a big idea, researching what others have done, making extensive plans as to how this dream might be implemented, talking with friends, family (and yes, even strangers) about this big idea, abandoning the project if it is way too big for even me, and making the feasible plan(s) become reality.”

Obviously I brainstormed the idea of a long-distance hiking trip on the Appalachian Trail. At two weeks into our two month hike, this Big Epic has certainly become a reality. But what about the middle stages? What was involved in the research and planning steps before we left? And how does that compare to the realities we are now experiencing?

“I have always found that plans are useless, but planning is indispensable.” – Dwight D. Eisenhower

Since high school, I have read books about folks who have completed epic hikes. (I’ve also read extensively about those who climb Mt. Everest—but that’s another story for another time.) In considering this trip, I conquered a mountain of books about the Appalachian Trail. Some I discarded as having little relevance to daughter and I. (Nope, we are not attempting to run the entire 2185 miles in less than two months. Nor was I looking for compulsively detailed reviews of each calorie consumed and every single shelter available along the length of the trail.) As I read, I took notes on any tips or hints that might come in handy for us. That became almost 30 typed pages (saved to my kindle for reference). Research

In addition to haunting our local library system for books, I did extensive research on the internet. I was especially interested in the experiences of families who hiked with their children. I needed to assess how feasible a long-distance hike would be with daughter as companion. If you wonder about families on the trail, check out these 2014 blogs from the Kallin Family and from the Tougas Family If you have some money to spare, definitely check out the video series put together by the Tougas Family.  (update 2017–these videos are now available for free) The videos were both entertaining and informative! (This was the only way I could get daughter to investigate what to expect for our trip…) internet research

Finally, any of you who know me personally, know that I am the Queen of Lists. I made lists of possible routes, lists of gear, lists of food, lists of how to divide the weight between each of our packs, lists of school projects for daughter, lists of temperature averages, lists and lists. And, of course, I had to make a master list to keep track of all the lists! A few of the most important lists are on the trail with us (such as learning ideas and what is included in our daily rations). A few other lists are in our “bounce box” to use when we are in town (including a master shopping list for food resupply). (If you want to see a few of these detailed lists, I have posted them at Trail Journals.) Lists

A significant question is how closely my plans and research match the realities of the trail… (that sounds like a good topic for another post…coming soon!)

Be Careful Out There!

The most common question we have been asked about making a long-distance backpacking trip on the Appalachian Trail has been “Is it SAFE?” The short answer is YES! The most significant way to be safe is to plan ahead. I’ve done extensive research to assure myself that this is a reasonable endeavor. I’m not generally a risk-taker about physical things. I’m careful without being fearful. (*Except heights…I’m terrified of heights*) Obviously, I would never want to cause nor allow harm to my daughter.

“A prudent camper is always asking ‘What if?’ in anticipation of potential human and natural hazards.”–from Hiking and Backpacking by the Wilderness Education Association

A number of friends have asked if we are carrying mace or pepper spray. Some have even wondered if I have a conceal/carry permit. Sprays have limited usefulness—needing to be kept close at hand and only being accurate at a short distance from the threat. In addition to being extra, unnecessary weight, guns are banned from most park service lands, including much of the Appalachian Trail corridor. No Guns

Many folks worry about human violence. Statistically, far fewer violent crimes occur along the AT than in any city. Backpackers are poor targets. They rarely carry anything of value. In addition, few criminals have any interest in hiking miles of challenging trail for the possibility of robbing or attacking someone. It is far easier to commit a crime and quickly escape while in an urban setting. We will take basic precautions such as camping further than a mile from any road crossing and not sharing details of our hiking plans with anyone—in person or online.

Others worry about being attacked by bears. This is actually a very rare occurrence. Black bears live near much of the AT, but these bears are shy and prefer to avoid humans if possible. It is recommended to sing or whistle while hiking so any bears in the area have time to move away. To avoid attracting bears (and other critters such as porcupines or raccoons) to our sleeping area, each night we will hang all food in a “bear bag” from a high tree limb at a distance from camp. While looking for illustrations for this point, it was interesting to see that the only photos of vicious looking bears were grizzly bears which are not found in the Eastern United States. Black Bears Are Shy

So what hazards are we likely to face? Driving to and from the trail is likely the most risky part of the entire trip! We need to carefully avoid poison ivy. Leaves of Three, Leave it BeHealth precautions such as filtering all water, burying human waste, and using hand sanitizer helps prevent illness. Being aware of weather conditions and taking appropriate measures avoid hypothermia are important. If one of us is injured, we are carrying basic first aid supplies. (Plus, I have certifications in Outdoor Emergency Care and as an EMT.) First Aid Supplies

For more safety tips, check out this page from the National Park Service. (But only if it will not make you MORE afraid for our safety!!)

While we are safe in the woods, be careful out there in the crazy world of modern life!

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